medresearch
medresearch:

Vitamin E in Canola and Other Oils Hurts Lungs
A large new Northwestern Medicine study upends our understanding of vitamin E and ties the increasing consumption of supposedly healthy vitamin E-rich oils – canola, soybean and corn – to the rising incidence of lung inflammation and, possibly, asthma.
The new study shows drastically different health effects of vitamin E depending on its form. The form of vitamin E called gamma-tocopherol in the ubiquitous soybean, corn and canola oils is associated with decreased lung function in humans, the study reports. The other form of vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol, which is found in olive and sunflower oils, does the opposite. It’s associated with better lung function.
This study was supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health grant R-1 AT004837. 
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medresearch:

Vitamin E in Canola and Other Oils Hurts Lungs

A large new Northwestern Medicine study upends our understanding of vitamin E and ties the increasing consumption of supposedly healthy vitamin E-rich oils – canola, soybean and corn – to the rising incidence of lung inflammation and, possibly, asthma.

The new study shows drastically different health effects of vitamin E depending on its form. The form of vitamin E called gamma-tocopherol in the ubiquitous soybean, corn and canola oils is associated with decreased lung function in humans, the study reports. The other form of vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol, which is found in olive and sunflower oils, does the opposite. It’s associated with better lung function.

This study was supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health grant R-1 AT004837.

Read More

scienceyoucanlove

fennetic:

Whole-brain functional imaging at cellular resolution using light-sheet microscopy (original video file 20MB)

Here we use light-sheet microscopy to record activity, reported through the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP5G, from the entire volume of the brain of the larval zebrafish in vivo at 0.8 Hz, capturing more than 80% of all neurons at single-cell resolution.

some background:

young zebrafish fry, commonly known in the aquarium trade as danios, are completely transparent. this makes them ideal for neuroscience since we can see everything happening at once. scientists would like to use a voltage sensitive dye, but current dyes are too slow to show individual firing events. so for now we have to genetically engineer fish with built-in reporter proteins, in this case a calcium concentration dependent green fluorescent protein.

a specially engineered fish is held in a block of clear gel, the microscope scans a blue laser beam across the fish 33 times a second, and a computer reconstructs the 3D volumetric image about once a second. the firing nerve cells actually glow green, not orange.  

at 385 seconds the fish sees something in its environment that startles it. this causes an explosion of nerve activity that slowly burns out. 

after the experiment, the fish was returned to its aquarium and monitored for changes. the scientists then attempted to map out the circuits of its brain and guess at how the neurons talk to each other. 

questions for the class:

  1. why did the scientists use a blue laser, wouldn’t the flickering lights give the fish a seizure?
  2. why use a laser at all? why not just rotate the fish or the camera?
  3. there are no hypotheses, experiments, or conclusions. is this science?
scienceyoucanlove
scienceyoucanlove:

This is what it looks like to swim between two continental plates. The Silfra fissure in Iceland separates the North American and Eurasian plates, which drift 2 cm away from each other every year, causing earthquakes about once per decade.Read more: http://huff.to/1lsEyN4 via The Huffington PostImage: Alex Mustard
source

The Silfra Fissure separating Iceland from North America

scienceyoucanlove:

This is what it looks like to swim between two continental plates. The Silfra fissure in Iceland separates the North American and Eurasian plates, which drift 2 cm away from each other every year, causing earthquakes about once per decade.

Read more: http://huff.to/1lsEyN4 via The Huffington Post

Image: Alex Mustard

source

The Silfra Fissure separating Iceland from North America

medresearch

medresearch:

Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have created a mouse model of muscular dystrophy in which degenerating muscle tissue gives off visible light.


Firefly image Courtesy of Shutterstock

The observed luminescence occurs only in damaged muscle tissue and in direct proportion to cumulative damage sustained in that tissue, permitting precise monitoring of the disease’s progress in the mice, the researchers say.

Learn more about this research

Funding: The study was funded by the Jain Foundation and the National Institutes of Health (grant DP1OD000392). The first author was research associate Katie Maguire, PhD.

medresearch

medresearch:

Mining the records of routine interactions between patients and their care providers can detect drug side effects a couple of years before an official alert from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a Stanford University School of Medicine study has found.


Photo: Nigam Shah and his colleagues have developed a method to extract data from records of interactions between doctors and patients to yield information about possible drug side effects.

The study, led by Nigam Shah, MBBS, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, was published online April 10 in Nature Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

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Funding: The study was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health (grant HG004028) for the National Center for Biomedical Ontology.